Plasma-Applied Silicone Coatings for the Next Generation of Medical Devices


May 2017 Newsletter

Plasma-Applied Silicone Coatings for the Next Generation of Medical Devices

Plasma-Applied Silicone Coatings for the Next Generation of Medical Devices


From Medical Design Briefs, April 1, 2017 by Ray Chen (PVA TePla, Calif., USA): “For products such as stainless steel guide wires, catheters, and vascular surgical tools, plasma-applied coatings offer properties that can distinguish them from their competitors. Coatings can provide everything from biocompatibility or lubricity to antimicrobial and anticorrosion properties. These modified surfaces can improve the functionality of devices such as intraluminal stents, occlusion balloons, and polymer coils."


Source:
Medical Design Briefs 
Image: Medical Design Briefs


Read Full Article   >

Transparent Silver: Tarnish-Proof Films for Flexible Displays, Touchscreens, Metamaterials

Transparent Silver: Tarnish-Proof Films for Flexible Displays, Touchscreens, Metamaterials


From the University of Michigan, March 21, 2017: “The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan (U-M), and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. By combining the silver with a little bit of aluminum, the U-M researchers found that it was possible to produce exceptionally thin, smooth layers of silver that are resistant to tarnishing. They applied an anti-reflective coating to make one thin metal layer up to 92.4 percent transparent. After several months, the film maintained its conductive properties and transparency. And it was firmly stuck on, whereas pure silver comes off glass with Scotch tape. The team showed that the silver coating could guide light about 10 times as far as other metal waveguides—a property that could make it useful for faster computing. And they layered the silver films into a metamaterial hyperlens that could be used to create dense patterns with feature sizes a fraction of what is possible with ordinary ultraviolet methods, on silicon chips, for instance.”


Source: University of Michigan
Image: Joseph Xu/University of Michigan Engineering


Read Full Article   >

Tipping Water: Finding the Balance between Keeping Molecules Whole or Splitting them on Oxides

Tipping Water: Finding the Balance between Keeping Molecules Whole or Splitting them on Oxides


From Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, February 2017: “Water is behind creating certain biofuels, sequestering carbon, and forming corrosive rust. If and how water (H2 O) breaks when it hits a metal oxide surface, such as a catalyst or a pipe, matters. In a pioneering study, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have definitively measured the stability of adsorbed water compared to the hydroxyl (-OH) fragments. They showed that there is a slight preference to keep water molecules intact. The research team showed that when water molecules do break, it is because surface forces align water molecules in a specific way, long before they hit the surface and dissociate.”


Source: Pacific Northwest National Lab 
Image: Nathan Johnson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory


Read Full Article   >

Towards Super-Efficient, Ultra-Thin Silicon Solar Cells

Towards Super-Efficient, Ultra-Thin Silicon Solar Cells


From Berkeley Lab, March 16, 2017, by Kathy Kincade: “Researchers at Ames Laboratory describe their efforts to develop a highly absorbing ultra-thin crystalline silicon solar cell architecture with enhanced light trapping capabilities. The key lies in the wavelength of light that is trapped and the nanocone arrays used to trap it. Their proposed solar architecture comprises thin flat spacer titanium dioxide layers on the front and rear surfaces of silicon, nanocone gratings on both sides with optimized pitch and height and rear cones surrounded by a metallic reflector made of silver. They then set up a scattering matrix code to simulate light passing through the different layers and study how the light is reflected and transmitted at different wavelengths by each layer.”


Source: Berkeley Lab
Image: Ames Laboratory/Prathap Pathi, Akshit Peer and Rana Biswas


Read Full Article   >

Rice Lab Expands Palette for Color-changing Glass

Rice Lab Expands Palette for Color-Changing Glass


From Rice University, March 8, 2017 by Jade Boyd: “The Nanophotonics team at Rice University creates low-voltage, multicolor, electrochromic glass. The projected annual market for electrochromic glass in 2020 has been estimated at more $2.5 billion. Researchers from the laboratory of Rice plasmonics pioneer Naomi Halas report using a readily available, inexpensive hydrocarbon molecule called perylene to create glass that can turn two different colors at low voltages. When they put charges on the molecules or remove charges from them, the glass goes from clear to a vivid color. They sandwiched these molecules between glass and were able to make something that looks like a window, but the window changes to different types of color depending on how we apply a very low voltage.”


Source: Rice University
Image: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University


Read Full Article   >

Global Spectroscopy Market Set to Expand

Global Spectroscopy Market Set to Expand


From Photonics Spectra, February 2017, by Justine Murphy: “The global spectroscopy market continues on its rise toward the billion dollar zone. With increasing applications in pharmaceuticals and the life sciences, as well as some in industrial settings and food safety, the market is witnessing steady growth in several areas. From $13.5 billion in 2015, this market is expected to hit $15.6 billion by 2020. North America alone will account for nearly $6 billion.”


Source: Photonics Spectra
Image: Photonics Spectra


Read Full Article   >

Nanostructures Lift the Fog

Nanostructures Lift the Fog


From Chemical and Engineering News, March 13, 2017, by Matt Davenport: “To state the obvious, water makes things wet. What may not be so obvious, however, is that even superhydrophobic surfaces can succumb to water’s propensity to moisten. Researchers often fashion tiny hydrophobic bumps, pillars, and protrusions on these surfaces to help keep water away. But they’ve found that fine fog droplets can still slip into the spaces between nanostructures and accumulate into larger drops to wet surfaces.”


Source: Chemical and Engineering News
Image: Nature Materials


Read Full Article   >

Rare Earths Become Water-repellent Only as They Age

Rare Earths Become Water-Repellent Only as They Age


From the University of Basel, March 22, 2017: “Surfaces that have been coated with rare earth oxides develop water-repelling properties only after contact with air. Even at room temperature, chemical reactions begin with hydrocarbons in the air. Researchers from the University of Basel, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Paul Scherrer Institute report that it is these reactions that are responsible for the hydrophobic effect.


The researchers coated glass pieces with rare earth oxides, nitrides and fluorides and analyzed how well they could be wetted with water. They could not detect any hydrophobic properties when the coating was freshly deposited. It was only chemical reactions with gaseous hydrocarbons found in the ambient air that increased the surfaces’ roughness and reduced wetting by water.”


Source: University of Basel
Image: University of Basel, Department of Physics


Read Full Article   >

Solid-State Lithium Sulfur Battery

Solid-State Lithium Sulfur Battery


From NASA Tech Briefs, March 1, 2017 by John H. Glenn Research Center: “Sulfur is a promising cathode for lithium batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity (1673 mAh/g), low cost, and environmental friendliness. With a high specific energy density of 2500 Wh/kg, which is a five times greater energy density than a conventional Li-ion battery, Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation high-energy storage systems. However, wide-scale commercial use has been limited because some key challenges, including the dissolution of the intermediate discharge product (Li2Sx , 2< x <8) in conventional liquid electrolytes, remain unsolved.”


Source: NASA Tech Briefs
Image: NASA Tech Briefs


Read Full Article   >

advertisers Index


0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
Ad-Pfeiffer_May
 
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
SEMICONSEA-Web-Banner_200x300

 

Inficon_May 


0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919
0f00f487-bfdd-4f0a-b023-cab4b9f96919

 

  


FunGLASS Research Center in Slovakia Established with €15M  from EU’s Horizon 2020

FunGLASS Research Center in Slovakia Established with €15M from EU’s Horizon 2020


From GlassOnline, April 12, 2017: “The global glass community received excellent news of a €25 million ($27 million) investment in glass research to establish the new Centre for Functional and Surface-Functionalized Glasses (FunGLASS) in Trencín, Slovakia. The Centre includes partner institutions in Germany, Spain, and Italy. The purpose of the Centre is to conduct cutting edge research on glasses with special functional properties, as well as investigate novel strategies for functionalizing conventional glasses. The aim is to modify properties and add new functionalities to expand the range of applications in the optical, energy, structural, and biomedical sectors.”


Source: GlassOnline
Image: GlassOnline


Read Full Article   >

Atom-scale Oxidation Mechanism of Nanoparticles Provides New Route for Anti-corrosion Materials Development

Atom-Scale Oxidation Mechanism of Nanoparticles Provides New Route for Anti-Corrosion Materials Development


From the Chinese Academy of Sciences, February, 22, 2017: “The research group from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China) discovered that oxide nanostructures (NSs) with a diameter less than 3 nm could exhibit an oxidation resistance much more superior than larger NSs. By investigating the oxidation mechanism at the atomic level, the team proposed, for the first time, a "dynamic size effect", that determines the stability of supported nanoparticles. This study not only brings the atomic understanding of the dynamic remodeling mechanism of nanocatalyst under the atmosphere, but also provides a new interface control for the development of anti-corrosion and anti-oxidation nano-protective coating.”


Source: Chinese Academy of Sciences
Image: Chinese Academy of Sciences/Fan Yang


Read Full Article   >

Nano-Polycrystalline Film Leads to Stronger Magnetism Compared to Single-Crystal Films

Nanopolycrystalline Film Leads to Stronger Magnetism Compared to Single-Crystal Films


From Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan), March 17, 2017: “Complex magnetic oxides are one of the most complicated material systems in terms of development and analysis. In addition, the detailed mechanism is unknown by which changes in atomic composition that do not affect overall structure lead to drastic changes in material characteristics even though the material structure is similar.


Researchers at Spin Electronics Group at Toyohashi Tech and at Myongji University, Harbin Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, University of California, San Diego, and Trinity College Dublin found that the nanoscale pillar-shaped distribution of iron in strontium titanate (STF) changes its magnetic and magnetooptical response drastically. Surprisingly, the polycrystalline sample showed stronger magnetism than single crystalline film. The STF films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition at various pressures directly on silicon substrate, and crystalline structure and magnetic properties were characterized systematically.”


Source: Toyohashi University of Technology
Image: Toyohashi University of Technology


Read Full Article   >

2016 AIMCAL Web Coating & Handling Conference

Smart Starts at SEMICON West

 

SEMICON West 2017 brings you the future as powered by microelectronics-enabled technologies. It connects the entire extended supply chain from materials, equipment, design, manufacturing, system integration, and demand channels to new verticals and adjacencies such as flexible hybrid electronics, MEMS and sensor, and more. With the assistance of virtual reality and artificial intelligence, you’ll experience advanced technologies and applications like Smart Auto, Smart Manufacturing, Smart MedTech, and IoT. The SEMI/Gartner symposium provides a midyear market update and interactive panel discussion. Visit 1100 exhibitors, partake of 115 hours of programs, and attend the enhanced networking events. July 11-13, San Francisco, CA.

 

Conference Details and Registration   >

SVC Membership

SVC Membership Offers Many Benefits


Join or renew your membership for 2017 now and enjoy the benefits of membership for the entire calendar year. Members enjoy free access to the SVC Digital Library and special discounts for many SVC products and services.


Learn More   >

 


SVConnections Contributing Editors:
Carl M. Lampert, SVC Technical Director
Joyce Lampert


©2017 Society Of Vacuum Coaters
9639 Kinsman Road, Materials Park, OH 44073-0002


Privacy Policy | Unsubscribe

 

Twitter Facebook LinkedIn